Lectures

ART HISTORY LECTURES

Presented by Eleanor Sypher, PhD

Eleanor holds a doctorate degree in Greek and Roman civilizations from Columbia University. Join us for these educational lectures, presented with wit and humour!

ART HISTORY LECTURES- Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse, 1869-1954

Part One, His Works from 1900 to 1917

Presented by Eleanor Sypher, PhD

Eleanor holds a doctorate degree in Greek and Roman civilizations from Columbia University. Join us for these educational lectures, presented with wit and humour!

Self-Portrait, 1906, oil on canvas, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen

French artist, known for his original use of color and line, who turned away from the principles of classical art—simplicity and grandeur, as did his rival and friend, Picasso.  The two of them together defined modern art in the early twentieth century.  Matisse first became infamous as the leader of the Fauves (wild beasts) who painted in outrageous colors.  Then, after 1906, he began to develop his own definitive style, emphasizing rhythm in flattened forms and decorative patterns, while imaginatively imitating African and Moorish art and producing dynamic abstractions in painting and sculpture.  In 1908 Matisse’s Notes of a Painter was published and remains an inspiration to artists and their followers.

Thursday, January 20, 2022 | 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Price: $10.00

Date: January 20, 2022

Available Spaces: 9

ART HISTORY LECTURES- Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse, 1869-1954

Part Two, His Works from 1918 to 1954

Presented by Eleanor Sypher, PhD

Eleanor holds a doctorate degree in Greek and Roman civilizations from Columbia University. Join us for these educational lectures, presented with wit and humour!

Icarus from Jazz, pub. Paris, 1947, 20 stenciled plates based on paper cutouts

In 1917, Matisse left Paris for Nice because he favored its brilliant sunshine and bright colors. His style, as well as that of Picasso, became more representational—a characteristic of post-World War I art. During WW II and later, Matisse remained in Nice creating sensuous representations of his favorite model, while illustrating beautiful books, including Jazz.  After surgery in 1941, Matisse became chair- or bed-bound and could no longer paint.  But he could manage paper cutouts with scissors (he called this “drawing with scissors”), resulting in lively abstractions. He used these as sketches for stained glass windows in the Matisse Chapel in Venice, a building which he designed.  These gorgeous collages remained his medium until his death in 1954.

Thursday, February 17, 2022 | 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Price: $10.00

Date: February 17, 2022

Available Spaces: 11

ART HISTORY LECTURES- John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent, 1856-1925

Presented by Eleanor Sypher, PhD

Eleanor holds a doctorate degree in Greek and Roman civilizations from Columbia University. Join us for these educational lectures, presented with wit and humour!

Gondoliers' Siesta, 1904, watercolor

John Singer Sargent's prosperous family moved from Philadelphia before Sargent was born and were nomads, moving through Europe with long stays in France, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Switzerland.  The artist’s first language was English, and he quickly acquired fluency in French, Italian and German.   His mother, an amateur watercolorist, encouraged his artistic talent at an early age.  At 18 he easily passed the rigorous exam to enroll in the École des beaux-arts and soon developed into a master portrait painter, influenced by a close study of Velázquez, Hals, El Greco, Goya, and Degas.   His subjects included Henry James, William Butler Yeats, Theodore Roosevelt and Claude Monet.  Henry James noticed that Sargent was “civilized down to his fingertips.”  Throughout his life, Sargent painted in watercolor, and, after 1900 it was the focus of his work.  Because of his watercolors, Sargent warrants the labels modernist, and even revolutionary.

Thursday, March 17, 2022 | 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Price: $10.00

Date: March 17, 2022

Available Spaces: 15

ART HISTORY LECTURES- Alice Neel

Alice Neel, 1900-1984

Presented by Eleanor Sypher, PhD

Eleanor holds a doctorate degree in Greek and Roman civilizations from Columbia University. Join us for these educational lectures, presented with wit and humour!

Call Me Joe, 1955, oil on canvas

An American artist, esteemed for her portraits of family, lovers, friends, poets, artists, and strangers.  In early and mid-century, even though Abstract Expressionists seemed to have derailed figurative drawing as serious art making, Neel remained herself in a return to the figure.

In the last 20 years of her life, she found fame in part because of her colorful personality and her willingness to share her story with audiences across the country.  She had lived in poverty in Spanish Harlem, deserted by her husband, while raising two boys--yet kept on painting.   

In her work, the female body is more real (often nude and pregnant) than idealized, not something to be worshipped or desired;  in fact, she mocked the Renaissance standard of perfect female anatomy.  Her dynamic portraits have a vibrant line, vivid color, and psychological intensity.  She lived life as both the “painting and the painter” (quote from Alice Neel, 1930, typescript, Neel Archives))

Thursday, May 19, 2022 | 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Price: $10.00

Date: May 19, 2022

Available Spaces: 15

A $10 contribution is requested to attend these presentations and enjoy the beverages and hors d’oeuvres provided.

** In order to allow for safe social distancing, attendance will be limited. If you would like to learn more about our safety procedures, please contact us for a copy of our Safety Code of Conduct. **

SHEMER ART CENTER | 5005 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix 85018
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